Must-Reads

 
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1. HURTING WORDS

Avid restaurant review readers will devour this New Yorker profile feature of The New York Times’s critic Pete Wells. “Pete Wells Has His Knives Out” is a great behind-the-scenes look at the job, but even more, it draws light on the power the critic has to make or break a restaurant.

 

2. IN THE HOUSE

“House Wine: What is it exactly?” answers a question that many people have probably not thought to ask. The assumption is that it’s some lowest common denominator wine at low cost, but this Bon Appetit article explains that it’s sometimes much more, and better.

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3. VINTAGES EXPLAINED

For beginning oenophiles, Wine Folly’s “Wine Vintages, and Why They Matter (Sometimes)” provides a clear, easy explanation of what makes a vintage good or bad, concluding with an intriguing paragraph that begins: “Considerable debate swirls as to who exerts more influence over a given bottle of wine. Is it the vintage or the vintner?”

 

4. DANISH FOR FOOD

The fifth edition of MAD, an annual symposium in Denmark of chefs and food leaders from around the world, aims to make the world’s kitchens and meals better through the exchange of knowledge. The New York Times’ “Highlights From the Food World’s Most Game-Changing Festival” shares a taste of what happened at this gathering named after the Danish word for “food”. 

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5. TEACH THEM WELL

Canadian food writer Corey Mintz—also a Modello contributor—makes the case in The Globe and Mail for teaching kids how to cook. If the education system would start early, he argues in “What’s the recipe for raising healthy kids? Teach them to cook and bake it into the school curriculum”, it could even lift strain on our health system later.

 
 
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